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Kenneth Noland at Mitchell-Innes & Nash


What follows is the announcement for the Kenneth Noland show at Mitchell-Innes & Nash that launches this Thursday in Chelsea. I was fortunate enough to assist with the research for the catalgue essay and have to say that the writing and approach on the man and his work are truly inspired. As always, Paul Hayes Tucker reveals inspired connections and a web of underlying themes in his treatment here of Noland, and both the show and the catalogue should not be missed. It was a joy to be a part of:

Mitchell-Innes & Nash is pleased to announce its first solo exhibition of paintings by Kenneth Noland, on view in the Chelsea gallery from March 17 – April 30. The exhibition, “Kenneth Noland: Paintings, 1958-1968,” will feature major paintings dating from the artist’s first decade of mature work. It will include significant early examples of the circle, stripe and chevron compositions that would become Noland’s signature forms throughout his career. The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with an essay by art historian Paul Hayes Tucker.

Kenneth Noland (1924-2010) is among the most influential Post-War abstract artists and one of the central figures of Color Field painting. His unprimed canvases with geometric forms painted in thin washes of pure, saturated color forged a new direction in abstract art. The artist’s stated aim was to explore “the infinite range and expressive possibilities of color.” Later referred to in the New York Times as “paradigms of American plain statement,” these spare, reductive works were seen as bold departures from Abstract Expressionism and as ‘minimalist’ painting.

This exhibition and extensive catalogue will present new insight into the artist’s life, his influences, and the impact American popular culture had on his art and vice-versa.

Image above is from WashingtonPost.com

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